SHADOW OF THE LION: THE FIELDS OF HADES

330px-Alexander1256ALEXANDER THE GREAT

We are driven by greed to win fame and power in unrighteous ways, and the more we have, the more we covet, until greed and blind ambition finally destroys us.

These are the closing lines of SHADOW OF THE LION: THE FIELDS OF HADES.  Volume Two of the SHADOW OF THE LION  duo is out soon.  I know you’re all waiting anxiously for it and you won’t be disappointed!  This is the most exciting part of the story of the fall of Alexander the Great’s dynasty When I read through the proofs I was on the edge of my seat. It seemed surreal that I actually wrote all those words, I know my Muse, Alexander, was there with me as I told his story through the characters that he loved and trusted. And I hope you enjoy his story as much as I did writing it!

Watch for SHADOW OF THE LION: THE FIELDS OF HADES to come out soon.  And in the New Year I’ll be holding a special book launch!

CATCHING UP: The Last Leg of the Journey

IMG_1803It’s been a while since I posted, mainly due to an unexpected move that was rather stressful and took up much of my time.  But now I’m resettled and happy to announce that the last leg of the journey of SHADOW OF THE LION has begun. The final proofs of Volume two are underway and SHADOW OF THE LION: THE FIELDS OF HADES is due to be published by October this year.inFOLIO Research Group

There have been a lot of delays to the point where I was getting worried, but I am assured that this second book about the fall of Alexander the Great’s dynasty will definitely be out soon. This will  happen while I am in Athens so I am hoping that there will be opportunities for more book readings and perhaps a mini launch while I’m there.

Volume Two THE FIELDS OF HADES picks up the trail of the two joint kings, young Alexander IV (ISKANDER) and his mentally deficient uncle ARRIDAIOS just as they are en route to Pella, the Royal City.  What happens after that is an exciting typical Greek-style tragedy when not only the generals begin to try to seize power, but the women, the  dangerous Queen OLYMPIAS  and the rash and ambition young ADEIA-EURYDIKE set off a deadly Civil War. With our antagonist KASSANDROS predominantly on the scene, the tension builds to a dramatic climax.  I’m sure that readers will be kept on the edges of their seats and pages will be turning as you read this exciting installment of SHADOW.

Stay tuned for further updates as the Publication Date draws nearer!

A Review about SHADOW OF THE LION: BLOOD ON THE MOON

IMG_1803Заливка пола с керамзитом

This review was written by Dinaz Kastrinaki, a good friend who was with me from the conception of SHADOW OF THE LION and read the earliest drafts.  It was presented at the reading at the Athens Centre on September 24/14

I started reading ‘Shadow of the Lion’ in the early 90s, when it was still in its infancy, and I was hooked.  I remember my frustration at it not being ready and having to wait to see what happens next.  I therefore did the next best thing.  I discussed it with Ruth as much as possible, and this continued until Ruthie’s last visit to Athens.  The memories of those long, excited sessions on my verandah over a glass or 3 of wine still make me smile and will always be very precious to me.

Ruth, being the bright little bundle of energy she is, plunged with gusto into unearthing any information she could about Alexander and his dynasty, not just by poring over endless history books in the library but by actually visiting places in Greece that were part of this history.  This in-depth research as well as her enthusiasm and love for what she was doing become very obvious when you read the book.

I have now read the book from cover to cover (finally!!) and I just couldn’t put it down, even though, having read several drafts over successive years, I sort of knew what would happen next.  The characters are so alive, so real, that I felt I was meeting old friends again.  I had grown to love them and I had missed them.  And, true to its title, Alexander’s golden shadow follows you through the book.

The descriptions are so vivid – I felt I was actually there, dazzled by the colours, breathing in the spices and the incense, hearing the chanting of the Magus and the tinkle of Roxanne’s bangles – the novel unfolded before me like a frieze.   I didn’t just enjoy it, I learned from it and I lived it.

Oh, and one more thing, kids would enjoy it too.  My son was a little over 10 when he read his first draft and enjoyed it immensely.

Ruthaki mou, bravo!  Bravo not just for your obvious talent and knowledge but for your spirit, your dedication and your endless enthusiasm all of which have made the novel what it is.  For me, it’s a beloved, brilliant book.  Bravo dear friend.

And by the way, if there are any television producers in the audience, I would advise you to grab the TV rights, it would make a fantastic series J

 

Introduction to SHADOW OF THE LION

When Alexander the Great, King of Macedon and conqueror of Asia, dies suddenly under suspicious circumstances at the age of thirty-three in Babylon, everyone who lives in his shadow are affected.  As the after-shocks of his death bring disorder in his Empire from Macedon to Persia, a deadly power struggle begins over who will rule.trevordiy.wordpress.com

At the centre of this political conflict is Alexander’s son, Iskander, born after Alexander’s death to his Soghdian wife Roxana.  Neither the boy nor his mother are accepted by the Macedonians who wanted a pure-blooded Macedonian to take the throne and chose Alexander’s mentally deficient half-brother Philip Arridaios to act as a joint-king, until little Alexander comes of age to claim the throne.

SHADOW OF THE LION is a story of political intrigue, ruthless ambition, racial prejudice, child abuse and exploitation.  It is a true story, with all the ingredients of a Greek tragedy.  The ‘shadow’ and spirit of Alexander is the golden thread woven throughout this vivid tapestry.  The differences between the opulent, aristocratic Persians and the rough highland warriors of Macedon provide a colourful contrast in the warp and weft of the prose.